Life is movement and our bodies were meant to be in motion. When thought in that context, it shouldn’t be surprising that staying active can help reduce the risk of dozens of diseases and health issues. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention want people to know that “the health benefits of physical activity far outweigh the risks of getting hurt.”

Even though I do not have a background in Chinese medicine, one of the reasons I love working at The YinOva Center is that it has an inherent focus on preventative care. Physical activity should make you feel good, sleep and think better, and help make you healthier. I try not to focus on solely losing weight through exercise because that is not everyone’s goal and can become a restricting stigma. I believe everyone can relate to wanting a long, healthy, independent life.

The main idea with injury prevention and exercise is to remember to not add on too much all at once. Whether you are walking, running, cycling, or lifting weights, you can’t expect see improvement overnight. The general rule of thumb to building muscle or endurance without hurting yourself to increase slowly and steadily. The F.I.T.T. principle for exercise prescription is a good place to start: Frequency, Intensity, Time and Type. You won’t want to change all four categories at once.

Beginning an exercise program can seem like a daunting task if you haven’t ever tried before. There is nothing wrong with starting small, in fact that’s exactly what I would recommend if your exercise experience is minimal. Start with taking a few brisk walks throughout the week, opting for the stairs when possible, offer your seat on the train to someone else, stand up frequently at work and move around. These small changes can start to make a big impact. When you are ready, try to find some time to dedicate to physical activity. If you are unsure of where to begin consult with a personal trainer or exercise professional. Try to find something that you actually enjoy doing. If you are going to dread it each week, it will definitely not become part of your weekly routine which would be the ultimate goal: 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity.

Share →